UMM FARAJ: STILL UNEASY, DESPITE SAFETY

UMM FARAJ: STILL UNEASY, DESPITE SAFETY
Investigations | 22 Oct 2014

Like many other Syrians, Umm Faraj's family suffered a long agonizing trip to escape the shelling and clashes in their area in the Homs countryside, until they eventually reached the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan.

This family of eight children suffered from poor services, the high cost of living in Jordan, in addition to the lack of employment opportunities; and were thus forced to leave the camp, towards the neighboring village in the hope of better conditions.

Umm Faraj tells Rozana: "In Syria, the children could not sleep at night. We came here hoping for a better situation, but did not find it better. In spite the absence of fear, our souls are still troubled."

Faraj never liked his school. Even after he came out of Syria, he never felt the importance of earning a degree to make a living.

He says about this matter: "Even if I were to complete my studies and did receive a certificate in Jordan; I will not be able to find a job here, according to the laws of the Jordanian Ministry of labor."

The boy adds: "I left school since the outbreak of the war in Syria, when I was in sixth grade. Two years have passed now, and here I am working as a tomato farmer in Jordan all day, for only seven dinars."

Faraj is awaiting his return to Syria to resume his studies, and either become an Arabic language professor, or a shepherd, as he puts it.

The family was exposed to danger several times, with thieves attempting to enter the open tent, and to physically abusing them.

Faraj suffers from solitude in his new village, after he lost his home and his friends and relatives in Syria. He has not yet been able to adapt to the new situation and the difficult circumstances here.

He explains: "Praise be to Allah, we feel safe in Jordan, and we also receive food aid. But our souls are uneasy here."

Faraj feels that his return to Syria is imminent. He believes he will return to rebuild destroyed homes and institutions with his peers fro his generation.


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